Filling the Gap

Jolley Mini-Grants provide funding for internship expenses

Brian Anderson ’17 used the funds from his Jolley Mini-Grant to pay for living expenses while interning at Great Day Gardens in Forest, Virginia, this summer.

Brian Anderson ’17 used the funds from his Jolley Mini-Grant to pay for living expenses while interning at Great Day Gardens in Forest, Virginia, this summer.

Brian Anderson ’17 had always wanted to try his hand at farming. Thanks to Randolph’s Jolley Mini-Grant program, he finally got the chance. The grant provided Anderson the funding he needed to spend the summer completing an internship at Great Day Gardens in Forest, Virginia.

Caitlin Jones '17 used a Jolley Mini-Grant to pay for living expenses and local museum visits while she interned for the Maryland Emergency Department Agency in Reisterstown, Maryland, this summer.

Caitlin Jones ’17 used a Jolley Mini-Grant to pay for living expenses and local museum visits while she interned for the Maryland Emergency Department Agency in Reisterstown, Maryland, this summer.

Available for the first time this summer through the Jolley Foundation, the Jolley Mini-Grant program provides students up to $4,000 to pay for expenses associated with internships. The grant funds may be combined with additional funding sources, including employer compensation, RISE awards, departmental awards, and other external and internal scholarships. “Our pilot year for the Jolley Mini-Grants was a great success,” said Maegan Crews, internship coordinator at Randolph. “Students were able to spend their summers gaining invaluable real world experience in places they hadn’t dreamed of being in the past. We are proud of this program and our students’ accomplishments.”

In addition to working the fields, Anderson operated Great Day Gardens’ table at the Lynchburg Farmers’ Market each week. Arden Jones, co-owner of the farm, enjoyed sharing her agricultural and business experience with a dedicated protégé.

“We didn’t realize that Randolph supported their interns so much,” Jones said. “We weren’t able to offer housing, so it’s definitely a plus that he was able to find affordable housing and also get credit. It worked out really well.”

Caitlin Jones ’17 used her Jolley Mini-Grant as a planning branch intern for the Maryland Emergency Department Agency in Reisterstown, Maryland. An environmental science major at Randolph, Jones assisted in rewriting the Fixed Nuclear Facility plan for the State of Maryland. She also attended a cyber-security tabletop exercise, after which she was asked to write a review for senior policyholders and the state’s top politicians.

“As wonderful as the internship was, it was unpaid,” Jones said. “I used most of my grant to cover housing and commuting fees. The rest helped cover my groceries and entrance into local museums, since I was close to the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. areas.”

Jenna Sweet '17 used her Jolley Mini-Grant to pay for living expenses while she interned at the Albemarle County Police Department's victim/witness unit this summer.

Jenna Sweet ’17 used her Jolley Mini-Grant to pay for living expenses while she interned at the Albemarle County Police Department’s victim/witness unit this summer.

A third student, Jenna Sweet ’17, used her grant funds during an internship with the Albemarle County Police Department’s victim/ witness unit. A biology major who one day hopes to work in a forensics laboratory, Sweet spent much of her summer in the Albemarle County courts, either filing and organizing papers, helping with protective orders, or watching cases in the circuit court.

“The internship was truly eye opening for me, as people don’t typically think about how crimes affect victims,” Sweet said. “Although I may not see myself going into law enforcement, it definitely changed my outlook on police work.”

The Jolley Grant paid for her housing, which would have been cost-prohibitive otherwise. “I am,” she added, “truly grateful that I was awarded a Jolley Grant.”