Career Focused

College partnerships provide students with unique internship opportunities

The set for an Endstation Theatre Company production of Hank Williams: Lost Highway

The set for an Endstation Theatre Company production of Hank Williams: Lost Highway

Thanks to two of Randolph’s newest partnerships, summer has become the opportune time for students to gain valuable work experience, especially in the fine arts. Their options? Live in London and work at one of the world’s most renowned art museums, or stay on Randolph’s campus and work with theatre professionals and other students from across the nation on productions for Central Virginia’s premier theatre company.

Sam Sun '17 paints part of the set for Hank Williams: Lost Highway.

Sam Sun ’17 paints part of the set for Hank Williams: Lost Highway.

Sam Sun ’17 chose the latter, painting sets for Endstation Theatre Company’s summertime productions, Much Ado About Nothing and Hank Williams: Lost Highway, both of which were performed at the College. One of many applicants from across the nation for the competitive apprenticeship, Sun relished the opportunity to learn first-hand about working on a professional stage crew.

“It was a unique and exciting experience,” Sun said. “Painting is always a joy for me, and I liked painting in that way because it was very different from just painting on a table. I also got to see how others do their jobs, like the lighting crews and carpenters, and how we cooperated with each other.”

A theatre major at Randolph, Sun worked closely with Krista Franco, Endstation’s production manager and resident scenic designer, who was impressed with his enthusiasm. She added that the experience also provides a great networking opportunity for students.

“When you do an internship or apprenticeship like this, you’re working with peers from all over the place and from big college theatre programs to smaller ones,” Franco said. “The people you work with today could be the people you work with later on in a career.”

Katya Schwab '17 worked in the National Gallery, London's development office.

Katya Schwab ’17 worked in the National Gallery, London’s development office.

Meanwhile, across the pond, Katya Schwab ’17 and Travis Byram ’18 had an unforgettable experience as the second pair of Randolph interns to work at the National Gallery, London. A communication studies major, Schwab helped manage and create social media accounts for the Gallery’s development office and wrote letters to potential donors.

“It’s a really incredible opportunity, especially to be able to go during the summer,” Schwab said. “And you don’t even have to have a lot of experience in art or art history.

Travis Byram '18 worked in the National Gallery, London's business, creative, and marketing departments.

Travis Byram ’18 worked in the National Gallery, London’s business, creative, and marketing departments.

I would encourage any student who thinks they might be interested in media development, even if they’re just a casual admirer of art, to look into this internship because you learn so much more than just what it’s like to work at an art gallery.”

Byram, an English major, split time between the business, creative, and marketing departments. Some of his highlights included writing an article that was published on the Gallery’s website and assisting at a press conference held by the Gallery’s director. He even saw Star Trek celebrity Patrick Stewart visiting one of the exhibits, and watched the Queen’s motorcade pass the Gallery during her birthday celebration.

“The really big draw for this program is getting to live in London,” Byram said. “What I gathered from it was an invaluable experience for whatever I do in life. I hope to go into the film industry, and that would be an endless collaboration with all kinds of people, so this was a huge experience.”